The effectiveness of utilizing cadaver dissection in enhancing anatomical knowledge of students and hands on experience for future doctors.

The efficacy of using YouTube on student’s knowledge acquisition and retention and critical thinking in human anatomy course

 

Background: In recent years, there has been a major shift toward the utilization of internet and user-generated content in anatomy education. Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Flickr, and Instagram are just a few examples of social media platforms (1). For instances, a research at the University of Sharjah discovered that a faculty-run Facebook Page was useful in enhancing anatomy knowledge beyond typical classroom lectures (2). For instance, a research at the University of Sharjah discovered that a faculty-run Facebook Page was useful in enhancing anatomy knowledge beyond typical classroom lectures. Another study conducted at the University of Southampton discovered that using Twitter to help students’ learning in a neuroanatomy module had a beneficial impact on medical students (3). According to a study conducted at Dublin College, the vast majority of second-year medical and radiation therapy students surveyed had used web-based platforms to source information, with 78 percent using YouTube as their primary source of anatomy-related video clips [4]. This is consistent with the findings of another study, which found that 85 percent of Venezuelan first-year medical students used YouTube videos to study human anatomy (5).

 

The effectiveness of utilizing cadaver dissection in enhancing anatomical knowledge of students and hands on experience for future doctors.

 

Anatomical knowledge is essential for students’ clinical skills acquisition, particularly when practicing surgery(6). The most commonly considered method for professional training and skill development among future doctors was dissection(7). Dissection gives students a valuable three-dimensional image of the human body, which not only improves their regional and system anatomy knowledge but also reinforces what they learned in lectures and tutorials(8)

Medical students’ cognitive ability and attention span improve as a result of dissection practice, as well as their physical endurance, which is an important prerequisite for medical students (9).

Students prefer dissection to models and prosections because it allows them to gain a better comprehension of the course objectives and a better three-dimensional understanding of the human anatomy (10).

 

 

 

 

 

The effects of using protection on student’s perception in medical and allied health schools .

 

Many programs have shifted from full-body dissection to prosections due to a shortage of donated bodies and a reduction in time allocated for dissection practice in modern integrated curricula. This cuts down on contact hours and allows students to spend more time studying structures that they might otherwise spend hours looking for and exploring in dissection classes(11). Many modern anatomy curricula propose an increased use of nontraditional teaching modalities such as cadaveric plastination, prosections, non-cadaveric models, and computer-based imaging(12). The use of prosected specimens and multimedia-based methods in teaching anatomy has expanded due to advancements in preservation procedures, manufacture of plastinated specimens, and fast increasing technology in medical education (13,14). Prosections have been viewed as useful for exploring, visualizing, and understanding interrelations of structures

 

 

 

 

1- M. Moran, J. Seaman, and H. Tinti-Kane, Teaching, Learning, and Sharing: How Today’s Higher Education Faculty Use Social Media, Babson Survey Research Group. Babson College, Babson Park, MA, USA, 2011

2- A. A. Jaffar, “Exploring the use of a facebook page in anatomy education,” Anatomical Sciences Education, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 199–208, 2014.View at:

3- C. M. Hennessy, E. Kirkpatrick, C. F. Smith, and S. Border, “Social media and anatomy education: using twitter to enhance the student learning experience in anatomy,” Anatomical Sciences Education, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 505–515, 2016.

4- D. S. Barry, F. Marzouk, K. Chulak-Oglu, D. Bennett, P. Tierney, and G. W. O’Keeffe, “Anatomy education for the YouTube generation,” Anatomical Sciences Education, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 90–96, 2016.

5- R. R. Reverón, “The use of YouTube in learning human anatomy by Venezuelan medical students,” MOJ Anatomy & Physiology, vol. 2, no. 7, p. 75, 2016.

6- Abdellatif H. Time Spent in Practicing Dissection Correlated with Improvement in Anatomical Knowledge of Students: Experimental Study in an Integrated Learning Program. Cureus. 2020;12(4):e7558. Published 2020 Apr 6. doi:10.7759/cureus.7558

7- Perception of medical students towards the clinical relevance of anatomy.Moxham BJ, Plaisant O

Clin Anat. 2007 Jul; 20(5):560-4.

 

8- Cadaveric dissection as an educational tool for anatomical sciences in the 21st century.

Ghosh SK

Anat Sci Educ. 2017 Jun; 10(3):286-299.

 

9- Anxiety among medical students when faced with the practice of anatomical dissection. Romo Barrientos C, José Criado‐Álvarez J, González‐González J, et al. Anat Sci Educ. 2019;12:300–309.

10- Paying respect to human cadavers: we owe this to the first teacher in anatomy. Ghosh SK. Ann Anat. 2017;211:129–134.

11- Human cadaveric dissection: a historical account from ancient Greece to the modern era. Ghosh SK. https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php?id=10.5115/acb.2015.48.3.153Anat Cell Biol. 2015;48:153–169.

 

12- Review of anatomy education in Australian and New Zealand medical schools. Craig S, Tait N, Boers D, McAndrew D. ANZ J Surg. 2010;80:212–216.

 

13- An update on the status of anatomical sciences education in United States medical schools. Drake RL, McBride JM, Pawlina W. Anat Sci Educ.

 

14- National survey on anatomical sciences in medical education. McBride JM, Drake RL. Anat Sci Educ. 2018;11:7–14.